Press

photo credit: Charles Osgood

2016

 

« Meriem Bahri’s costumes once again are spectacularly striking, especially the divine raiment of Giove, Giunone, and Diana, which mix classical and baroque styles. »
Barnaby Hughes – STAGE AND CINEMA

 

« […] charming production by Haymarket design stalwarts Sarah Edgar, Meriem Bahri, Zuleyka V. Benitez and Lindsey Lyddan. […] Bahri’s ornate costumes included plumed headgear for the gods, a red velvet tunic for Endimione and goat-fleece pants for the satyrs. »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

 

2015

 

« As always, Meriem Bahri’s sumptuous costumes are one of the chief delights of a HOC production. She manages to get everything so perfectly right, not just historically, but aesthetically, from the embroidered fringe of Oriana’s gown to the magical symbols on Melissa’s frock. They must be seen to be fully appreciated. »
Barnaby Hughes – STAGE AND CINEMA

 

« Bahri, HOC’s resident costume designer since the company’s inception, quite outdid herself with her eye-filling, richly textured costumes. »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

« Meriem Bahri’s sumptuous costumes, especially the contrast between Oriana’s soft red gown and Melissa’s stiff, ornate, dark brocade, conveyed us to the 18th century. »
Wynne Delacoma – CHICAGO CLASSICAL REVIEW

 

« This was Haymarket’s most visually appealing show to date, with a sumptuous array of period-perfect costumes (love the neck ruffs) […] »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

« Meriem Bahri’s gorgeous and well-researched costume designs are one of the chief delights of this production […] »
Barnaby Hughes – STAGE AND CINEMA

 

« The entrance of a sartorially resplendent quintet of shepherds and shepherdesses—well appointed by costume director Meriem Bahri—marked the opening of the second scene […] »
Tim Sawyier – CHICAGO CLASSICAL REVIEW

 

 

2014

 

Featured in The People Issue – Click for full article
Deanna Isaacs – CHICAGO READER

 

« Caruana’s cast is genderless, seemingly empowered and subjugated by their black garb and bright blue eye makeup; Meriem Bahri’s costumes, imaginative in their regal-goth design, look interchangeable for both sexes. »
SEECHICAGODANCE.COM

 

« Though Meriem Bahri’s plethora of costumes and masks can be distracting, she has great fun with that sexual ambiguity. The straps of tutu-like bustiers for the men outline their nipples, while Tiffany McCord as Lully is apparently topless, her breasts cleverly disguised. »
Laura Molzahn – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

« Meriem Bahri’s lavish costume design brings the baroque era vividly to life through embroidered silks, flowing linen sleeves and colorful ribbons on every surface. »
Barnaby Hughes – STAGE AND CINEMA

 

« Pastoral leitmotifs unified this courtly entertainment, not only in the music but also in the period-specific costume and set designs of Haymarket stalwarts Meriem Bahri and David Mayernik, respectively.”

“Bahri’s eye-filling costumes were a splendid time-trip in themselves, notably Diana’s patterned-velvet mantua, the huntresses’ forest-green gowns and the hunters’ beige and brown doublets, breeches and tonnelets.”
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

« […] with some of the sharpest and most character-revealing costume work to date here by the ingenious Meriem Bahri […] »
Andrew Patner – CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

 

« Most stylish early opera productions in 2014″
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

 

2013

 

« […] like Meriem Bahri’s artful costumes, the designs faithfully adhered to 18th-century theatrical style and were eye-catching to boot. »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

« At Haymarket, even the costume designers have a scholarly grounding, and Meriem Bahri’s period outfits, changing from act to act — especially Vespetta’s once she had hit the jackpot — told the story […] »
Andrew Patner – CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

 

« Decked out in period wigs and Meriem Bahri’s richly textured costumes, the dozen cast members looked as if they had stepped out of 17th century English paintings. »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

 

2012

 

« Dressed in Meriem Bahri’s simple, rustic costumes, the performers looked as if they had stepped out of an 18th century landscape painting. »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 

« Meriem Bahri’s ornate period costumes and set designer David Mayernik’s painted revolving panels mirrored the authentic sounds emanating from Trompeter’s « pit » band. »
John von Rhein – CHICAGO TRIBUNE